News: brad@bradhaugaard.com   •  Restaurants   •  Map  •  Potholes, Etc.  •  Library Catalog  •  Facebook / Twitter / RSS

Monrovia Council To Consider Opening Cloverleaf Access Point to Wilderness Area; Friday Night Fair Operator



At its next meeting ( http://goo.gl/wqksZB ) the Monrovia City Council will consider purchasing easements from two property owners (for $175,000 each) to open the Cloverleaf access point to the Hillside Wilderness Area. The city will also spend between $50,000-$100,000 to install gates and locking mailboxes for the residents, to put in a water fountain and perform trail upgrades. Money to pay for the easements and improvements would come from the current Hillside Wilderness Preserve fund, from savings the city is seeing from refinancing the bonds for the wilderness area at a lower interest rate, and from $165,000 that accrues annually until 2031 as the city pays down the bonds. http://goo.gl/HW15y0

~ At a 5 p.m. study session, the council will discuss the Friday Night Street Fair Operator Assessment Process. http://goo.gl/E6vF5H

Comment: I have been nagging about the Cloverleaf access point for years, and I am happy to see this measure finally on the agenda. Assuming it is adopted by the City Council, it means the Cloverleaf entry point to the Wilderness Area will finally be open to hikers and bicyclists, as was promised years ago. This, in turn, means that for practical purposes the amount of trail area more than doubles.

What do I mean by, "for practical purposes?" Well, imagine a loop trail with the far side of the loop high up the side of a mountain. You hike way up the mountain, then way down the other side of the loop, which circles around towards where you started. BUT! Just as you are about to get back to where you started, you encounter a locked gate and you have to turn around and climb all the way back up the mountain and then all the way back down the way you came.

So, most non-super-athletes will hike to the top of the loop then turn around and come back down the same way they went up, meaning that one half (or more) of the loop is "for practical purposes" not really available to any but super athletes. This is precisely the problem that opening the Cloverleaf gate solves.

Thank you, Oliver Chi and city staff for the work you have done to finally bring this before the City Council. And please, City Council. Please approve it.

- Brad Haugaard

13 comments:

  1. Wow. I'll hold my breath, but this would be fantastic. 18 years after we voted on it! With the owners up there being so opposed to anyone entering their sanctuary (and friends with the mayor), I really doubt it will happen. Crossing fingers

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am sure the mayor will block this and once again demonstrate he cares nothing for the Monrovia public other than his special friends. It's a very sad state of affairs.

      Delete
    2. Oops, wrong again. The Mayor did vote on this and now, after 11 months in office this will be opened soon.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  2. The vote for buying the easement is on April 5. Then they have to do some improvements, build an access gate, etc. Looking like this will happen in the coming year or two if this is approved.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I live on Hidden Valley, I'm not a friend of the mayor, don't even know him, yet I do feel like I have the right to be protective of my "sanctuary" using the succinct word used by anonymous above. Open the trail - in general, it makes perfect sense to me because of the loop issue. I just don't want my driveway blocked by cars, trash strewn about and loud, drunk people walking around at 1:00 in the morning like what's happening at other access points. Is it too much to ask that this is figured out before it's open?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. what's wrong with sharing the misery? we all have to deal with it up here on canyon blvd. what makes you so special?

      Delete
    2. So you'd rather us "share the misery" rather than find a solution? That's mature. Do you complain to anyone about your situation and try to get action, or just sit back and take it?

      Delete
    3. Actually, the proposal tries to minimize impact to neighbors. Install trash receptical to minimize litter; drinking fountain so people aren't drinking from your hose; gates so people don't wander on your property. I'm sure it's not perfect, but nothing is, and if you demand perfection first, nothing will ever be done. But, if you look at the report I think you'll find the city has gone a long way to minimize problems.

      Delete
    4. Hi Brad, I totally agree - I don't demand perfection, and in talking with most of my neighbors, they don't either. The city has really tried to be accommodating, and I appreciate that. Thank you for your reply. I guess I just wanted people to know that there are those of us (I know not all of us) who aren't friends with the major and think we're better than others. I grew up in El Monte, for goodness sake. My husband and I have worked really hard all of our lives to be able to live in an area that we love. It's just a bummer to be slammed by people for wanting to be cautious. Thanks again for listening, Brad! Take care. :)

      Delete
  4. I can't figure out from the Ar-1 how the trail will work... I think it mentions going to the west side of the reservoir and off the fire road... Will there be a crossover switchback like the east side to go over the other privately owned part of the road or will the city try to get another easement purchased a mile up from the gate?

    ReplyDelete
  5. One of my concerns about the Cloverleaf entrance into the HWP, is parking. If you've seen the 20 - 40 cars parked on Canyon Blvd below Monrovia Canyon Park every Saturday and Sunday I can totally understand the concerns of the people living on Cloverleaf and Hidden Valley. Unlike the very wide Canyon Blvd, these two streets are very narrow. If a parking lot was put in on the west side of the Truck Trail, just north of the gate, might be a solution.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Honestly, I don't think opening the trail will impact your lives that much because, frankly, the trail doesn't offer much to the general public. No waterfall, no stream, not much of a draw compared to Monrovia Canyon. I think you will mostly get local folks walking their dogs, hikers looking for a training hike or mountain bikers, groups that are mostly respectful of property & trails. The gate will be need to be locked at night though because you know our kids will be up there partying!

    ReplyDelete